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Here are some resources we feel would be useful for you.

If there are topics that you would like to get more information on, please feel free to contact us.


 

 

WHAT DO I NEED? HOW MUCH SHOULD I PAY?

When you call Bob Goodall at Goodall Pelt & Carper, P.C. ,(540)-659-3130, to ask about estate planning, we will send you for free in advance an explanation of the main things which we discuss in a face-to-face consultation, which will include a review of what you have already done. For example, you may have bank accounts with survivorship or pay-on-death (POD) provisions. You may have life insurance with designated beneficiaries. You may have beneficiaries for retirement accounts, etc. We can discuss the consequences of what you have done. It may be exactly what you want; or it may need to be changed.

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One convenient way to direct assets at death is through the beneficiary designation.
For example bank accounts and certificates of deposit can be in your name with a pay-on-death (POD) provision naming the persons could receive the balance of the account when you die. Retirement accounts, IRAs and life insurance policies will name a beneficiary. You can even make a revocable transfer-on-death deed for real estate.

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A divorce decree cannot and does not end your responsibility as a parent. Parents are forever. Both parents should make every attempt to play a vital part in the lives of their children, and allow one another to do so. Children need the ongoing affection, interest and concern of their parents. Children must feel that they have two parents who love them, even though they could not live happily with each other.

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From: The Virginia State Bar

 

 

 

Our most common bankruptcy client is an individual or married couple. They may have a house with a mortgage or two. They have a car with a car loan, and an older car without a loan. They have household furnishings, clothing, bank accounts and retirement accounts. Debts have become overwhelming due to loss of income, uninsured medical expenses, or divorce.

They need a bankruptcy judge to discharge their debts – to declare that they do not owe those debts any longer, so they can have a “fresh start”. Then they will not have to use future income to pay past debts. But they fear they will lose all their property if they file bankruptcy.

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Congratulations on attaining adulthood! Reaching the age of eighteen is a significant milestone in your life that is accompanied by serious rights and responsibilities. This booklet, developed by the Virginia State Bar and the Conference of Local Bar Associations, will help you understand these rights and responsibilities. As an adult citizen of the Commonwealth of Virginia, you must be informed about your rights and the legal consequences of your actions. I urge you to read this booklet and use it as a resource as you begin your path into adult life. I hope that this booklet, coupled with your own education, will supply the knowledge necessary to become a responsible and valuable member of your family, your  community, and the Commonwealth of Virginia.

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From: Virginia State Bar

 

            A trust is a property management arrangement in which one person called a “settlor” or “grantor” creates the trust and transfers property to it. A “trustee” holds title to the property and manages it and uses it according to the directions of the settlor. The people who benefit from the trust are called “beneficiaries”.

            A revocable living trust is the type of trust most frequently used for estate planning. In a revocable living trust, the same person is the one who creates the trust and transfers property to it, the trustee who manages the property and the initial beneficiary.

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The Bankruptcy Law Section of the Virginia State Bar has prepared this pamphlet as a public service to answer basic questions about the bankruptcy process. This pamphlet cannot address every issue that may arise when considering bankruptcy, however, it will provide an introduction to basic concepts that can be discussed in detail with an attorney.  This information is directed to individuals, but it is also important for businesses and creditors.

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From: The Virginia State Bar

 

 

 

            You need a will if you want to leave property at your death to anyone other than the people who will inherit from you if you don’t have a will. In Virginia, the people who inherit from you if you don’t have a will are, in this order of priority:

  1. Your spouse inherits everything, unless you have any children who are not also your spouse’s children. In that event, all of your children (any children you have before your marriage to your spouse and any children you have with your spouse) receive 2/3 of your estate, and your spouse receives the remaining 1/3.
  2. Your children and the descendants of any children who have died before you.
  3. Your parents, or the survivor of them.
  4. Your brothers and sisters and their descendants.
  5. Half to your father’s relatives and half to your mother’s relatives. The lists go on forever.

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The Senior Citizens Handbook is a resource for seniors, their families, and their caregivers to provide an overview of and contact information for opportunities and choices facing senior citizens today, with a summary of how specific laws affect Virginia's elder citizens and practical advice on issues such as Medicaid, Alzheimer’s Disease, landlord-tenant relations, and much more. There is also an extensive list of community-service organizations that detail the various services available to senior citizens.

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From: The Virginia State Bar

 

1259 Courthouse Road, Suite 101
Stafford, Virginia 22554

 

E -mail: info@gpc-lawyers.com
Phone: (540) 659-3130
Fax: (540) 659-0291

 

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